How NOT to ask for Reviews from your Customers - Affixsol
Reviews

How NOT to ask for Reviews from your Customers

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Shared by Travis Johnson Founder, Affixsol 
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How NOT to ask for Reviews from your Customers

Unless a majority of them are negative, having more reviews is better than having fewer reviews. Sometimes, the total number of reviews for a product or company is prominently displayed on the website, and can serve as visual shorthand that helps consumers decide to click or purchase.

It‘s good business to ask your customers to provide reviews, as long as it isn’t too aggressive or a quid-pro-quo.

There‘s a fine line between encouraging reviews and demanding them. Even Yelp, which, without a steady stream of new reviews, would be as useful as a knife and fork in a hot dog eating contest, discourages businesses from overtly asking for reviews.

 

Customer Connections Matter

As a practical matter, however, businesses do often ask their customers to provide reviews on sites like Google, Yelp, and TripAdvisor.

 “What we’ve found is that when there is a more personal connection between the business and the customer, whether it‘s a server, a manager, an owner, customers are more likely to provide a review,”

TripAdvisor and Google do not prohibit or discourage review solicitation the same way Yelp does, but businesses everywhere are asking for reviews, and they should.”

 

Use Creative Ways to Ask for Reviews

One story we learned about was a restaurant manager had trained all his employees and encouraged his employees happy table service for reviews. The manager’s encouragement was giving employee perks to ask for reviews which obviously came with excellent service.

 

How to ask Illegally!

You can read more about this action here but, in a nutshell, a company was charging customer $50 if they did not write a review and would refund their money if they did. The United States Federal Trade Commission settled the case in 2015 but charging customers for not writing a review is stupid and illegal. Now, you may chuckle and think I would not do this yet, keep in mind – reviews are powerful.

 

So What Now?!?

Ask for reviews but ask with class and respect! Be creative with your team to encourage great service and asking! Address each review – good or bad – within 24 hrs of posting. Every little connection with your customers build engagement and connections.

 

 

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